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Sugarcane

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Plant Starch

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Wood Fibre

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Wood

Our Products

We sell biodegradable packaging for food. It lasts as long as it’s needed – not longer.

  • All our products are made from plant raw materials.
  • Biodegradable packaging is completely compostable.
  • Use biodegradable packaging to achieve zero waste.
  • Plant materials are renewable, sustainable and have a lower environmental footprint.
  • Plant materials are natural and non- toxic, so are our products.
  • Handypak Brown with Paper Twist Handle 80-gsm – 250 Units

    R820.62 incl. VAT
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  • No8 Brown Kraft Bag – 500 Units

    R282.46 incl. VAT
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  • Med Shopper Brown Kraftbag 62gsm – 250 Units

    R476.65 incl. VAT
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  • Hot Dog Bag Brown Kraft – 500 Units

    R150.31 incl. VAT
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  • 500ml Double Wall Kraft Cup

    R70.66R1,413.12 incl. VAT
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  • 350ml Double Wall Kraft Cup

    R37.71R754.24 incl. VAT
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  • 250ml Double Wall Kraft Cup

    R31.65R632.89 incl. VAT
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  • 250ml Compostable Paper Cup Black Lid

    R42.50R849.92 incl. VAT
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  • Bamboo Skewer Golf 15cm – 100 Units

    R19.31 incl. VAT
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  • Bamboo Skewer Golf 18cm – 100 Units

    R20.33 incl. VAT
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  • Bamboo Skewer Ribbon 10.5cm – 100 units

    R21.03 incl. VAT
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  • Bamboo Skewer Ribbon 6cm – 100 Units

    R19.44 incl. VAT
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  • 500ml Double Wall Kraft Cup

    R70.66R1,413.12 incl. VAT
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  • 350ml Double Wall Kraft Cup

    R37.71R754.24 incl. VAT
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  • 250ml Double Wall Kraft Cup

    R31.65R632.89 incl. VAT
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  • 8mm Unwrapped Paper Straws

    R12.33R493.03 incl. VAT
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Our Products

We sell biodegradable packaging for food. It lasts as long as it’s needed – not longer.

  • All our products are made from plant raw materials.
  • Biodegradable packaging is completely compostable.
  • Use biodegradable packaging to achieve zero waste.
  • Plant materials are renewable, sustainable and have a lower environmental footprint.
  • Plant materials are natural and non- toxic, so are our products.

Latest News

How to Tell if Your Hot Cup Lid is Compostable

Identifying compostable Hot Cup Lids is super easy. Just look for the embossed words which say ‘Compostable Lid’ in the middle of the lid above the sippy hole. The lid will also have the letters ‘PLA’ below the triangular material code. That’s all you need to check to be sure your lid is made from low-carbon polylactic acid (PLA). PLA is made from renewable corn starch and has been designed so that it can biodegrade in a compost pile. PLA also produces less carbon during the manufacturing process than plastic. So it’s more environmentally friendly before and after use. If your lid isn’t embossed with the words ‘Compostable Lid’ and ‘PLA’ then it’s just made from non-biodegradable plastic and won’t break down. At GREEN HOME, we only sell compostable products. So, you can rest assured that our Hot Cup lids are ALWAYS fully compostable. We wouldn’t have it any other way.

GREEN HOME Interviews: Hayley McLellan – Advocating a Plastic Bag Free South Africa

Last week, Hayley McLellan took time out of her busy schedule to meet up with GREEN HOME’s Environmental Research Ambassador, Cassandra Gamble, to chat about oceans, plastic shopping bags and activism. Hayley is the Environmental Campaigner for the Two Oceans Aquarium and creator of the Rethink the Bag Campaign. She is 100% determined to see a ban on plastic shopping bags in South Africa. “I was a Lone Voice in the Wilderness” Hayley’s experiences in the early days of campaigning for a plastic shopping bag-free South Africa are reminiscent of those of GREEN HOME’s founder, Catherine Morris. In fact, Hayley quit plastic shopping bags the same year that Catherine started GREEN HOME: 2007. She describes feeling like a lone voice in the wilderness. Back then the plastic pollution crisis had yet to hit mainstream news and words like ‘microplastic’ and ‘biodegradable’ and ‘compostable’ were barely known.  People didn’t understand the need to ban plastic bags, or choose compostable products. Sea Change Not so anymore. Today Hayley feels strongly supported in her cause. People are waking up and her excitement is palpable. She strongly believes the tipping point – where plastic bags are finally banned in South Africa – is coming soon. She points out that many African countries have already banned plastic bags, and that our government is under increased pressure to act. Tourism, waste management, health and conservation are all sectors that will benefit. And, of course, wildlife and oceans will be safer. Hayley says that the true environmental costs of plastic bags are not taken into account when measuring their impacts, with life cycle analyses and reports focusing on production and transport. But what happens after use? How do you measure and quantify sea mammals and birds eating or getting trapped in plastic bags? “We Won’t Recycle our way out of this Mess” Recently, the large supermarket chains have all scrambled to make sure their plastic bags are recyclable. And many consumers are taking this as enough of a reason to keep using them. But Hayley is still urging consumers to just say NO to single-use bags, whether they’re recyclable or not. “We won’t recycle our way out of this mess.” she says.  Lots of bags still make their way into the environment. They’re still not biodegradable. And every time plastic is recycled its quality decreases. So of the few bags that are recycled, often lower-grade products are made which are destined to become waste themselves. Hayley also really wants consumers to enjoy the feeling of empowerment that comes with living plastic bag free. She calls it an added bonus – the great way we feel when we exercise our conscious choice as consumers. Instead of feeling inconvenienced, she notes that refusing plastic bags is liberating and empowering. In closing she asks, “How do you eat an elephant?” Answer: “One bite at a time.” “And how do we create a plastic bag free South Africa?” “One person at a time.” 3 July 2019 is International Plastic Bag Free Day. But why wait when you can start right now? Join the campaign and start enjoying a life free of plastic bags today.

GREEN HOME Interviews: Phindi Dlamini – Sustainable Growth Champion

We recently sat down with Phindi Dlamini, our longest standing employee at GREEN HOME, and Gauteng and Africa New Business Developer. Phindi has been in the game for many years. So we were very excited to get her insights into the industry, how it has changed since she started and what she sees for the future of biodegradable food packaging in Africa. Phindi, thank you so much for taking the time to chat with us. Can you give us some info into your background and history with the company. I was born and raised in Swaziland, which is where I met Catherine, before moving to South Africa in 1996. I came on board about three months after Catherine started GREEN HOME. Cat was running the business from her garage and I was working from mine. I recall getting our first consignment in August and being so excited but scared at the same time. Since then the company has grown substantially. It’s been exciting! From our first consignment in 2007 and a total of 90 cartons to now having offices and warehouses in both Johannesburg and Cape Town. It’s been a radical change. You have been working at GREEN HOME for 12 years now. What has your involvement in the company been thus far? Since I started working for GREEN HOME, my role has been and still is bringing in new business nationally and internationally. For the last three or four years there has been a growing demand in the African market so that is currently my major focus area. Working for a sustainable business must be eye opening. What is your outlook on sustainability in South Africa and where it’s heading? There seems to be some sort of movement towards sustainability in South Africa. Some areas are proving to be very dedicated and for others sustainability is merely a buzzword. A problem I’ve noticed is that people aren’t quite realizing the full circle of sustainability and what it takes to implement. It is definitely heading in the right direction, however. As part of a women-owned and managed business in the predominantly male packaging sector, how important do you think female empowerment and leadership is in creating an equitable and sustainable South Africa? A big part of mitigating inequalities of the past is women empowerment. If we look at the packaging industry it is very much a male dominated environment. I don’t know of any other woman owned companies in the industry. Perhaps because it’s not a sexy environment but I think GREEN HOME brought the sexy to food packaging. Look at our Kraft cups for instance. Female empowerment in South Africa is of great importance, and I am so happy to be a part of a company that supports that. Was working for a Green business always something you were interested in? What sparked that interest? No, it really wasn’t. I come from a psychology background and always assumed that was the route I would take. However, I was also privileged enough to come from a background that recognized environmental issues. So, when Cat approached me about the opportunity, it wasn’t a difficult decision. As soon as she told me about the product and it being compostable – understanding what I did, I was sold and suddenly wondered why plant-based packaging wasn’t already in the market. What advice would you give to other people working in this space or aspiring to? I’d say buckle up. Packaging is still very much dominated by males as well as non-environmentally-friendly materials and still is very much a pricing game. It really is the battle against plastic, but it is so rewarding knowing you’re making a real difference in the world. So, you need to really consider the above and come into this space with a strong game plan. GREEN HOME is on a mission to make biodegradable packaging in the norm by 2030. What do you see as a key challenge to reaching this goal? The key challenge is people wrapping their heads around the concept and realizing it’s the product of the future. GREEN HOME was the first to pioneer compostable food packaging in SA. We are still working on changing perceptions and getting people to understand how compostable food packaging fits into the bigger picture, what circular economies are and then getting people on board. It’s up to us to provide businesses in SA with the info they need to make the GREEN choice an easy one for them. Do you have a vision for the growth of sustainability in packaging in Africa? What does that look like to you? Yes, Africa is still the biggest market to tackle and there is massive opportunity for growth here, but it starts with education. The huge lack of local environmental education means that large numbers of people don’t understanding the negative impacts polystyrene and plastic have on the environment. There are parts of Africa that are taking positive steps towards making a change. For example, Kenya implemented a plastic bag ban. The problem is you can’t just throw the word biodegradable at people who don’t understand what it means and expect them to implement the change. Once people really start to understand I think we will start to see some major shifts towards sustainability. Do you believe there’s a chance that Africa leads the way in tackling plastic pollution? Yes, but we would need to act soon. Every month we’re hearing of another state/ city banning plastic. We need to do it in South Africa, but we need to do it with the understanding of what we are doing and the effect it’s going to have. What have you enjoyed the most in your journey with GREEN HOME?   Seeing the incredible growth take place.  

GREEN HOME is a carbon neutral company. To see our offset certificate click here.